Putting the patient at the centre of IPE - lessons from a new medicine and pharmacy initiative
— Dr. Judith Strawbridge, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin
 

Presentation Summary: A novel patient-centered interprofessional learning initiative was developed in 2015 to enable 3rd year pharmacy students and 2nd year graduate-entry medical students to learn with, from and about each other with respect to the care of a patient with diabetes and a patient with a rheumatological condition. There are similar numbers in the classes allowing the students to be divided evenly into small groups. The students met in their small groups to compile a list of questions to ask the patient and the wider multidisciplinary team. The students then came together in a large group and had the opportunity to ask the patients and the team their questions, facilitated by the lead consultant in the speciality. There were also short presentations by other medical specialists, clinical nurse specialists, podiatrists, and an interactive session on how to review a kardex. Students were required to collaborate in undertaking a kardex review and submit the review along with a joint reflection on the experience.

Dr. Judith Strawbridge is a founding lecturer of the School of Pharmacy at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and has been involved in the design and delivery of teaching and learning since the School opened in 2002. She has a PhD in Pharmacy Education and her research interests lie in curriculum design and outcome evaluation, novel teaching methods and assessment, and integrated and interprofessional education.

Clinicians, patients and family members utilisation, opinions and experiences of patient and family participation in the design and delivery of healthcare services from a mental healthcare and a medical healthcare perspective.
— Lucy Whiston, Trinity College Dublin
 

Presentation Summary: Patient and family participation in healthcare design and delivery is when the views of patients and family members are sought and taken into account in designing, delivering and improving new and existing healthcare services. Internationally, a number of interventions to encourage patient and family participation have been examined. However, no consensus appears to have been reached. This study aims to explore the utilisation, opinions and experiences of patient and family participation in healthcare design and delivery in Ireland from a mental and a medical healthcare service perspective. The mental healthcare service is a psychiatry service and the medical healthcare service is a type 2 diabetes service. Patients, family members, clinicians and policy leaders are included. Clinical disciplines include nursing, psychiatry, endocrinology, psychology, occupational therapy, dietetics and podiatry. Questionnaires were completed with patients and family members. Focus groups and interviews with patients, family members, clinicians and policy leaders were also employed.

Lucy Whiston Is in the first year of her PhD as an Irish Research Council Scholar and working as the Adelaide Research Assistant in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care in Trinity College Dublin. She has been working in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care since 2012. Her PhD focuses on patient and family participation in healthcare design and delivery in Ireland from a mental healthcare and a medical healthcare perspective. The aim is to develop an intervention to encourage patient and family participation. The first study within her PhD focuses on utilisation, opinions and experiences of patient and family participation. This will provide an overview of the opinions of a variety of stakeholder groups and disciplines as well as identifying the challenges and barriers to patient and family participation. Currently, she is also working on a ‘Health Asset and Needs Assessment of Tallaght’ which provides a platform for the inclusion of patient and public opinion on service development in the area and ‘A National Survey of Chronic Disease Management in Ireland’ which compares the views of a number of disciplines including practice nurses, consultants, GPs and patients.

Team and patient-centred communication: a foundation for safe, quality care
— Thomas Kearns and Dr. Eva Doherty, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin

Presentation Summary: Communication underlies successful healthcare, communication and interpersonal competencies are a fundamental requirement for professional healthcare practice. It is internationally recognised that better communication leads to better health care and increased satisfaction. Irish data supports this assertion.

Thomas Kearns is Executive Director of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland